Qualified Lawyer & Project Manager; we interview Obinna Okonkwo

Please note that all opinions expressed in this interview are the opinions of the lawyer interviewed. They do not necessarily represent the opinion of their employer or of Legally Engaged.

Private Equity (PE) is smart money deployed by investment management companies (usually PE firms) on behalf of themselves and other investors (e.g. pension funds, sovereign wealth funds, High Net-worth Individuals etc.) to invest in businesses and help such businesses grow. After a few years, the fund’s stake in the business is sold.

The most common ways a company raises money for expansion are either through loans or by listing its shares on an exchange. Private equity money isn’t made available publicly, but by investors who invest on behalf of themselves and other institutional investors in control for a stake in the business. They are also involved in the governance of the company (usually by taking up seats on the board) for the duration of their investment. This is why I call it smart money

A PE lawyer is usually involved in structuring and negotiating transactions such as buyouts, mergers and acquisitions (M&A), joint ventures, restructurings, divestitures etc. as well as drafting the requisite documentation required to close those transactions.

Apart from providing email responses to client’s questions on Nigerian law issues with regard to the transactions, I regularly take part in drafting, reviewing, negotiating and issuing comments on various agreements such as Investment Agreements, Share Subscription Agreements, Share Sale and Purchase Agreements, as well as Shareholders’ Agreements.

I also conduct due diligence investigations on target companies, i.e. companies that are sought to be acquired by organizations such as PE firms. The due diligence documents are usually uploaded to a virtual data room (i.e. an online site) for review, but there are occasions where the investigations may require visiting the target company’s offices to review hard copies of documents to verify the information provided.

My decision to study law was greatly influenced by my mother, who is an accomplished lawyer herself.  In my younger years, whenever I got into ‘trouble’, my mom was the one to go to – I was inspired by how she was always able to argue her way out of a variety of situations and thus aspired to be like that.

After choosing to study law, I wasn’t provided with much guidance on how to navigate through my career.  My mother suggested that I become a civil servant, but I didn’t fancy it because it didn’t seem ambitious enough.

I am delighted that I ended up becoming a corporate lawyer, considering that I was only advised to join the civil service.  It is a bit embarrassing but my decision to be a corporate lawyer was greatly influenced by a fictional character named Harvey Specter from a television series titled Suits.  I took a liking to the manner with which he closed deals and the confidence his clients reposed in him, so I considered it not bad to emulate him.  I didn’t have a plan at the beginning, but things sort of came through and I gradually leaned towards Private Equity and Corporate M&A once I started working at my current firm. Do I have any regrets? No

A young lawyer would need to be commercially aware.  Read the news and stay up to date with new laws, government policies, market statistics, the focus of investors and thriving industries, etc. Other soft skills like networking skills and the ability to build relationships are equally important because lawyers should always think of generating new business/clients and solidifying the existing ones.

I work mostly with global and local private equity investors, strategic buyers and sellers and other financial sponsors

It’s quite busy as expected, but nothing out of the ordinary – the typical level of work one would expect to face as a 5th-year lawyer. I work for 10 hours per day on average, but on some occasions (e.g. when a transaction is intense or about to close), then I may be required to for work longer hours (or even on weekends) to meet deadlines. I usually work as part of team, so everyone usually puts in their own bit, that way there’s not too much work left for only one person

The satisfaction on a client’s face, or the tone of their voice or email when you give them practical solutions that help solve their problems.  For me, there is nothing more rewarding than that.

Not quite.  There’s a lot of focus on theoretical (as opposed to practical) knowledge in the Law School and you find that it takes you about a minimum of 2 – 3 years of practice to really start to get a hang of things.  The Law School syllabus isn’t reflective of what truly obtains in the corporate legal world.

I’m just taking each day as it comes for now, but I don’t see myself leaving the practice of law.  I enjoy what I do.  It’s still early days in my career, so I’m making sure I garner as much experience as I can.  In the long term, I would like to be one of the go-to lawyers for corporate clients looking to do business/invest in Africa and, dare I say, maybe even the best African private equity lawyer that God ever created.

The most memorable thing that happened while working as a Private Equity Lawyer was receiving a cake and chocolate from a client after a deal closed.  It’s that memorable because it’s the only time that’s happened – and I enjoyed it

Take your career where you think it should go, not where others think it should go. Learn the trade and skills required for you be exceptional in this industry. Focus on building a long-lasting career instead of being fixated on obtaining immediate financial gratification.

legallyengagedQualified Lawyer & Project Manager; we interview Obinna Okonkwo
Read More

Foreign Lawyer – Reginald Aziza

Please note that all opinions expressed in this interview are the opinions of the lawyer interviewed. They do not necessarily represent the opinion of their employer or of Legally Engaged.

Private Equity (PE) is smart money deployed by investment management companies (usually PE firms) on behalf of themselves and other investors (e.g. pension funds, sovereign wealth funds, High Net-worth Individuals etc.) to invest in businesses and help such businesses grow. After a few years, the fund’s stake in the business is sold.

The most common ways a company raises money for expansion are either through loans or by listing its shares on an exchange. Private equity money isn’t made available publicly, but by investors who invest on behalf of themselves and other institutional investors in control for a stake in the business. They are also involved in the governance of the company (usually by taking up seats on the board) for the duration of their investment. This is why I call it smart money

A PE lawyer is usually involved in structuring and negotiating transactions such as buyouts, mergers and acquisitions (M&A), joint ventures, restructurings, divestitures etc. as well as drafting the requisite documentation required to close those transactions.

Apart from providing email responses to client’s questions on Nigerian law issues with regard to the transactions, I regularly take part in drafting, reviewing, negotiating and issuing comments on various agreements such as Investment Agreements, Share Subscription Agreements, Share Sale and Purchase Agreements, as well as Shareholders’ Agreements.

I also conduct due diligence investigations on target companies, i.e. companies that are sought to be acquired by organizations such as PE firms. The due diligence documents are usually uploaded to a virtual data room (i.e. an online site) for review, but there are occasions where the investigations may require visiting the target company’s offices to review hard copies of documents to verify the information provided.

My decision to study law was greatly influenced by my mother, who is an accomplished lawyer herself.  In my younger years, whenever I got into ‘trouble’, my mom was the one to go to – I was inspired by how she was always able to argue her way out of a variety of situations and thus aspired to be like that.

After choosing to study law, I wasn’t provided with much guidance on how to navigate through my career.  My mother suggested that I become a civil servant, but I didn’t fancy it because it didn’t seem ambitious enough.

I am delighted that I ended up becoming a corporate lawyer, considering that I was only advised to join the civil service.  It is a bit embarrassing but my decision to be a corporate lawyer was greatly influenced by a fictional character named Harvey Specter from a television series titled Suits.  I took a liking to the manner with which he closed deals and the confidence his clients reposed in him, so I considered it not bad to emulate him.  I didn’t have a plan at the beginning, but things sort of came through and I gradually leaned towards Private Equity and Corporate M&A once I started working at my current firm. Do I have any regrets? No

A young lawyer would need to be commercially aware.  Read the news and stay up to date with new laws, government policies, market statistics, the focus of investors and thriving industries, etc. Other soft skills like networking skills and the ability to build relationships are equally important because lawyers should always think of generating new business/clients and solidifying the existing ones.

I work mostly with global and local private equity investors, strategic buyers and sellers and other financial sponsors

It’s quite busy as expected, but nothing out of the ordinary – the typical level of work one would expect to face as a 5th-year lawyer. I work for 10 hours per day on average, but on some occasions (e.g. when a transaction is intense or about to close), then I may be required to for work longer hours (or even on weekends) to meet deadlines. I usually work as part of team, so everyone usually puts in their own bit, that way there’s not too much work left for only one person

The satisfaction on a client’s face, or the tone of their voice or email when you give them practical solutions that help solve their problems.  For me, there is nothing more rewarding than that.

Not quite.  There’s a lot of focus on theoretical (as opposed to practical) knowledge in the Law School and you find that it takes you about a minimum of 2 – 3 years of practice to really start to get a hang of things.  The Law School syllabus isn’t reflective of what truly obtains in the corporate legal world.

I’m just taking each day as it comes for now, but I don’t see myself leaving the practice of law.  I enjoy what I do.  It’s still early days in my career, so I’m making sure I garner as much experience as I can.  In the long term, I would like to be one of the go-to lawyers for corporate clients looking to do business/invest in Africa and, dare I say, maybe even the best African private equity lawyer that God ever created.

The most memorable thing that happened while working as a Private Equity Lawyer was receiving a cake and chocolate from a client after a deal closed.  It’s that memorable because it’s the only time that’s happened – and I enjoyed it

Take your career where you think it should go, not where others think it should go. Learn the trade and skills required for you be exceptional in this industry. Focus on building a long-lasting career instead of being fixated on obtaining immediate financial gratification.

legallyengagedForeign Lawyer – Reginald Aziza
Read More

Public Sector – Funmi Owuye

Please note that all opinions expressed in this interview are the opinions of the lawyer interviewed. They do not necessarily represent the opinion of their employer or of Legally Engaged.

Private Equity (PE) is smart money deployed by investment management companies (usually PE firms) on behalf of themselves and other investors (e.g. pension funds, sovereign wealth funds, High Net-worth Individuals etc.) to invest in businesses and help such businesses grow. After a few years, the fund’s stake in the business is sold.

The most common ways a company raises money for expansion are either through loans or by listing its shares on an exchange. Private equity money isn’t made available publicly, but by investors who invest on behalf of themselves and other institutional investors in control for a stake in the business. They are also involved in the governance of the company (usually by taking up seats on the board) for the duration of their investment. This is why I call it smart money

A PE lawyer is usually involved in structuring and negotiating transactions such as buyouts, mergers and acquisitions (M&A), joint ventures, restructurings, divestitures etc. as well as drafting the requisite documentation required to close those transactions.

Apart from providing email responses to client’s questions on Nigerian law issues with regard to the transactions, I regularly take part in drafting, reviewing, negotiating and issuing comments on various agreements such as Investment Agreements, Share Subscription Agreements, Share Sale and Purchase Agreements, as well as Shareholders’ Agreements.

I also conduct due diligence investigations on target companies, i.e. companies that are sought to be acquired by organizations such as PE firms. The due diligence documents are usually uploaded to a virtual data room (i.e. an online site) for review, but there are occasions where the investigations may require visiting the target company’s offices to review hard copies of documents to verify the information provided.

My decision to study law was greatly influenced by my mother, who is an accomplished lawyer herself.  In my younger years, whenever I got into ‘trouble’, my mom was the one to go to – I was inspired by how she was always able to argue her way out of a variety of situations and thus aspired to be like that.

After choosing to study law, I wasn’t provided with much guidance on how to navigate through my career.  My mother suggested that I become a civil servant, but I didn’t fancy it because it didn’t seem ambitious enough.

I am delighted that I ended up becoming a corporate lawyer, considering that I was only advised to join the civil service.  It is a bit embarrassing but my decision to be a corporate lawyer was greatly influenced by a fictional character named Harvey Specter from a television series titled Suits.  I took a liking to the manner with which he closed deals and the confidence his clients reposed in him, so I considered it not bad to emulate him.  I didn’t have a plan at the beginning, but things sort of came through and I gradually leaned towards Private Equity and Corporate M&A once I started working at my current firm. Do I have any regrets? No

A young lawyer would need to be commercially aware.  Read the news and stay up to date with new laws, government policies, market statistics, the focus of investors and thriving industries, etc. Other soft skills like networking skills and the ability to build relationships are equally important because lawyers should always think of generating new business/clients and solidifying the existing ones.

I work mostly with global and local private equity investors, strategic buyers and sellers and other financial sponsors

It’s quite busy as expected, but nothing out of the ordinary – the typical level of work one would expect to face as a 5th-year lawyer. I work for 10 hours per day on average, but on some occasions (e.g. when a transaction is intense or about to close), then I may be required to for work longer hours (or even on weekends) to meet deadlines. I usually work as part of team, so everyone usually puts in their own bit, that way there’s not too much work left for only one person

The satisfaction on a client’s face, or the tone of their voice or email when you give them practical solutions that help solve their problems.  For me, there is nothing more rewarding than that.

Not quite.  There’s a lot of focus on theoretical (as opposed to practical) knowledge in the Law School and you find that it takes you about a minimum of 2 – 3 years of practice to really start to get a hang of things.  The Law School syllabus isn’t reflective of what truly obtains in the corporate legal world.

I’m just taking each day as it comes for now, but I don’t see myself leaving the practice of law.  I enjoy what I do.  It’s still early days in my career, so I’m making sure I garner as much experience as I can.  In the long term, I would like to be one of the go-to lawyers for corporate clients looking to do business/invest in Africa and, dare I say, maybe even the best African private equity lawyer that God ever created.

The most memorable thing that happened while working as a Private Equity Lawyer was receiving a cake and chocolate from a client after a deal closed.  It’s that memorable because it’s the only time that’s happened – and I enjoyed it

Take your career where you think it should go, not where others think it should go. Learn the trade and skills required for you be exceptional in this industry. Focus on building a long-lasting career instead of being fixated on obtaining immediate financial gratification.

legallyengagedPublic Sector – Funmi Owuye
Read More

Academia – Reason Emma Abajuo

Please note that all opinions expressed in this interview are the opinions of the lawyer interviewed. They do not necessarily represent the opinion of their employer or of Legally Engaged.

Private Equity (PE) is smart money deployed by investment management companies (usually PE firms) on behalf of themselves and other investors (e.g. pension funds, sovereign wealth funds, High Net-worth Individuals etc.) to invest in businesses and help such businesses grow. After a few years, the fund’s stake in the business is sold.

The most common ways a company raises money for expansion are either through loans or by listing its shares on an exchange. Private equity money isn’t made available publicly, but by investors who invest on behalf of themselves and other institutional investors in control for a stake in the business. They are also involved in the governance of the company (usually by taking up seats on the board) for the duration of their investment. This is why I call it smart money

A PE lawyer is usually involved in structuring and negotiating transactions such as buyouts, mergers and acquisitions (M&A), joint ventures, restructurings, divestitures etc. as well as drafting the requisite documentation required to close those transactions.

Apart from providing email responses to client’s questions on Nigerian law issues with regard to the transactions, I regularly take part in drafting, reviewing, negotiating and issuing comments on various agreements such as Investment Agreements, Share Subscription Agreements, Share Sale and Purchase Agreements, as well as Shareholders’ Agreements.

I also conduct due diligence investigations on target companies, i.e. companies that are sought to be acquired by organizations such as PE firms. The due diligence documents are usually uploaded to a virtual data room (i.e. an online site) for review, but there are occasions where the investigations may require visiting the target company’s offices to review hard copies of documents to verify the information provided.

My decision to study law was greatly influenced by my mother, who is an accomplished lawyer herself.  In my younger years, whenever I got into ‘trouble’, my mom was the one to go to – I was inspired by how she was always able to argue her way out of a variety of situations and thus aspired to be like that.

After choosing to study law, I wasn’t provided with much guidance on how to navigate through my career.  My mother suggested that I become a civil servant, but I didn’t fancy it because it didn’t seem ambitious enough.

I am delighted that I ended up becoming a corporate lawyer, considering that I was only advised to join the civil service.  It is a bit embarrassing but my decision to be a corporate lawyer was greatly influenced by a fictional character named Harvey Specter from a television series titled Suits.  I took a liking to the manner with which he closed deals and the confidence his clients reposed in him, so I considered it not bad to emulate him.  I didn’t have a plan at the beginning, but things sort of came through and I gradually leaned towards Private Equity and Corporate M&A once I started working at my current firm. Do I have any regrets? No

A young lawyer would need to be commercially aware.  Read the news and stay up to date with new laws, government policies, market statistics, the focus of investors and thriving industries, etc. Other soft skills like networking skills and the ability to build relationships are equally important because lawyers should always think of generating new business/clients and solidifying the existing ones.

I work mostly with global and local private equity investors, strategic buyers and sellers and other financial sponsors

It’s quite busy as expected, but nothing out of the ordinary – the typical level of work one would expect to face as a 5th-year lawyer. I work for 10 hours per day on average, but on some occasions (e.g. when a transaction is intense or about to close), then I may be required to for work longer hours (or even on weekends) to meet deadlines. I usually work as part of team, so everyone usually puts in their own bit, that way there’s not too much work left for only one person

The satisfaction on a client’s face, or the tone of their voice or email when you give them practical solutions that help solve their problems.  For me, there is nothing more rewarding than that.

Not quite.  There’s a lot of focus on theoretical (as opposed to practical) knowledge in the Law School and you find that it takes you about a minimum of 2 – 3 years of practice to really start to get a hang of things.  The Law School syllabus isn’t reflective of what truly obtains in the corporate legal world.

I’m just taking each day as it comes for now, but I don’t see myself leaving the practice of law.  I enjoy what I do.  It’s still early days in my career, so I’m making sure I garner as much experience as I can.  In the long term, I would like to be one of the go-to lawyers for corporate clients looking to do business/invest in Africa and, dare I say, maybe even the best African private equity lawyer that God ever created.

The most memorable thing that happened while working as a Private Equity Lawyer was receiving a cake and chocolate from a client after a deal closed.  It’s that memorable because it’s the only time that’s happened – and I enjoyed it

Take your career where you think it should go, not where others think it should go. Learn the trade and skills required for you be exceptional in this industry. Focus on building a long-lasting career instead of being fixated on obtaining immediate financial gratification.

legallyengagedAcademia – Reason Emma Abajuo
Read More

Academia Kenneth Okwor

Please note that all opinions expressed in this interview are the opinions of the lawyer interviewed. They do not necessarily represent the opinion of their employer or of Legally Engaged.

Private Equity (PE) is smart money deployed by investment management companies (usually PE firms) on behalf of themselves and other investors (e.g. pension funds, sovereign wealth funds, High Net-worth Individuals etc.) to invest in businesses and help such businesses grow. After a few years, the fund’s stake in the business is sold.

The most common ways a company raises money for expansion are either through loans or by listing its shares on an exchange. Private equity money isn’t made available publicly, but by investors who invest on behalf of themselves and other institutional investors in control for a stake in the business. They are also involved in the governance of the company (usually by taking up seats on the board) for the duration of their investment. This is why I call it smart money

A PE lawyer is usually involved in structuring and negotiating transactions such as buyouts, mergers and acquisitions (M&A), joint ventures, restructurings, divestitures etc. as well as drafting the requisite documentation required to close those transactions.

Apart from providing email responses to client’s questions on Nigerian law issues with regard to the transactions, I regularly take part in drafting, reviewing, negotiating and issuing comments on various agreements such as Investment Agreements, Share Subscription Agreements, Share Sale and Purchase Agreements, as well as Shareholders’ Agreements.

I also conduct due diligence investigations on target companies, i.e. companies that are sought to be acquired by organizations such as PE firms. The due diligence documents are usually uploaded to a virtual data room (i.e. an online site) for review, but there are occasions where the investigations may require visiting the target company’s offices to review hard copies of documents to verify the information provided.

My decision to study law was greatly influenced by my mother, who is an accomplished lawyer herself.  In my younger years, whenever I got into ‘trouble’, my mom was the one to go to – I was inspired by how she was always able to argue her way out of a variety of situations and thus aspired to be like that.

After choosing to study law, I wasn’t provided with much guidance on how to navigate through my career.  My mother suggested that I become a civil servant, but I didn’t fancy it because it didn’t seem ambitious enough.

I am delighted that I ended up becoming a corporate lawyer, considering that I was only advised to join the civil service.  It is a bit embarrassing but my decision to be a corporate lawyer was greatly influenced by a fictional character named Harvey Specter from a television series titled Suits.  I took a liking to the manner with which he closed deals and the confidence his clients reposed in him, so I considered it not bad to emulate him.  I didn’t have a plan at the beginning, but things sort of came through and I gradually leaned towards Private Equity and Corporate M&A once I started working at my current firm. Do I have any regrets? No

A young lawyer would need to be commercially aware.  Read the news and stay up to date with new laws, government policies, market statistics, the focus of investors and thriving industries, etc. Other soft skills like networking skills and the ability to build relationships are equally important because lawyers should always think of generating new business/clients and solidifying the existing ones.

I work mostly with global and local private equity investors, strategic buyers and sellers and other financial sponsors

It’s quite busy as expected, but nothing out of the ordinary – the typical level of work one would expect to face as a 5th-year lawyer. I work for 10 hours per day on average, but on some occasions (e.g. when a transaction is intense or about to close), then I may be required to for work longer hours (or even on weekends) to meet deadlines. I usually work as part of team, so everyone usually puts in their own bit, that way there’s not too much work left for only one person

The satisfaction on a client’s face, or the tone of their voice or email when you give them practical solutions that help solve their problems.  For me, there is nothing more rewarding than that.

Not quite.  There’s a lot of focus on theoretical (as opposed to practical) knowledge in the Law School and you find that it takes you about a minimum of 2 – 3 years of practice to really start to get a hang of things.  The Law School syllabus isn’t reflective of what truly obtains in the corporate legal world.

I’m just taking each day as it comes for now, but I don’t see myself leaving the practice of law.  I enjoy what I do.  It’s still early days in my career, so I’m making sure I garner as much experience as I can.  In the long term, I would like to be one of the go-to lawyers for corporate clients looking to do business/invest in Africa and, dare I say, maybe even the best African private equity lawyer that God ever created.

The most memorable thing that happened while working as a Private Equity Lawyer was receiving a cake and chocolate from a client after a deal closed.  It’s that memorable because it’s the only time that’s happened – and I enjoyed it

Take your career where you think it should go, not where others think it should go. Learn the trade and skills required for you be exceptional in this industry. Focus on building a long-lasting career instead of being fixated on obtaining immediate financial gratification.

legallyengagedAcademia Kenneth Okwor
Read More

In house (Finance) – Ayokunle Ayoko

Please note that all opinions expressed in this interview are the opinions of the lawyer interviewed. They do not necessarily represent the opinion of their employer or of Legally Engaged.

Private Equity (PE) is smart money deployed by investment management companies (usually PE firms) on behalf of themselves and other investors (e.g. pension funds, sovereign wealth funds, High Net-worth Individuals etc.) to invest in businesses and help such businesses grow. After a few years, the fund’s stake in the business is sold.

The most common ways a company raises money for expansion are either through loans or by listing its shares on an exchange. Private equity money isn’t made available publicly, but by investors who invest on behalf of themselves and other institutional investors in control for a stake in the business. They are also involved in the governance of the company (usually by taking up seats on the board) for the duration of their investment. This is why I call it smart money

A PE lawyer is usually involved in structuring and negotiating transactions such as buyouts, mergers and acquisitions (M&A), joint ventures, restructurings, divestitures etc. as well as drafting the requisite documentation required to close those transactions.

Apart from providing email responses to client’s questions on Nigerian law issues with regard to the transactions, I regularly take part in drafting, reviewing, negotiating and issuing comments on various agreements such as Investment Agreements, Share Subscription Agreements, Share Sale and Purchase Agreements, as well as Shareholders’ Agreements.

I also conduct due diligence investigations on target companies, i.e. companies that are sought to be acquired by organizations such as PE firms. The due diligence documents are usually uploaded to a virtual data room (i.e. an online site) for review, but there are occasions where the investigations may require visiting the target company’s offices to review hard copies of documents to verify the information provided.

My decision to study law was greatly influenced by my mother, who is an accomplished lawyer herself.  In my younger years, whenever I got into ‘trouble’, my mom was the one to go to – I was inspired by how she was always able to argue her way out of a variety of situations and thus aspired to be like that.

After choosing to study law, I wasn’t provided with much guidance on how to navigate through my career.  My mother suggested that I become a civil servant, but I didn’t fancy it because it didn’t seem ambitious enough.

I am delighted that I ended up becoming a corporate lawyer, considering that I was only advised to join the civil service.  It is a bit embarrassing but my decision to be a corporate lawyer was greatly influenced by a fictional character named Harvey Specter from a television series titled Suits.  I took a liking to the manner with which he closed deals and the confidence his clients reposed in him, so I considered it not bad to emulate him.  I didn’t have a plan at the beginning, but things sort of came through and I gradually leaned towards Private Equity and Corporate M&A once I started working at my current firm. Do I have any regrets? No

A young lawyer would need to be commercially aware.  Read the news and stay up to date with new laws, government policies, market statistics, the focus of investors and thriving industries, etc. Other soft skills like networking skills and the ability to build relationships are equally important because lawyers should always think of generating new business/clients and solidifying the existing ones.

I work mostly with global and local private equity investors, strategic buyers and sellers and other financial sponsors

It’s quite busy as expected, but nothing out of the ordinary – the typical level of work one would expect to face as a 5th-year lawyer. I work for 10 hours per day on average, but on some occasions (e.g. when a transaction is intense or about to close), then I may be required to for work longer hours (or even on weekends) to meet deadlines. I usually work as part of team, so everyone usually puts in their own bit, that way there’s not too much work left for only one person

The satisfaction on a client’s face, or the tone of their voice or email when you give them practical solutions that help solve their problems.  For me, there is nothing more rewarding than that.

Not quite.  There’s a lot of focus on theoretical (as opposed to practical) knowledge in the Law School and you find that it takes you about a minimum of 2 – 3 years of practice to really start to get a hang of things.  The Law School syllabus isn’t reflective of what truly obtains in the corporate legal world.

I’m just taking each day as it comes for now, but I don’t see myself leaving the practice of law.  I enjoy what I do.  It’s still early days in my career, so I’m making sure I garner as much experience as I can.  In the long term, I would like to be one of the go-to lawyers for corporate clients looking to do business/invest in Africa and, dare I say, maybe even the best African private equity lawyer that God ever created.

The most memorable thing that happened while working as a Private Equity Lawyer was receiving a cake and chocolate from a client after a deal closed.  It’s that memorable because it’s the only time that’s happened – and I enjoyed it

Take your career where you think it should go, not where others think it should go. Learn the trade and skills required for you be exceptional in this industry. Focus on building a long-lasting career instead of being fixated on obtaining immediate financial gratification.

legallyengagedIn house (Finance) – Ayokunle Ayoko
Read More

In house (Telecoms) – Bolu Ojewole

Please note that all opinions expressed in this interview are the opinions of the lawyer interviewed. They do not necessarily represent the opinion of their employer or of Legally Engaged.

Private Equity (PE) is smart money deployed by investment management companies (usually PE firms) on behalf of themselves and other investors (e.g. pension funds, sovereign wealth funds, High Net-worth Individuals etc.) to invest in businesses and help such businesses grow. After a few years, the fund’s stake in the business is sold.

The most common ways a company raises money for expansion are either through loans or by listing its shares on an exchange. Private equity money isn’t made available publicly, but by investors who invest on behalf of themselves and other institutional investors in control for a stake in the business. They are also involved in the governance of the company (usually by taking up seats on the board) for the duration of their investment. This is why I call it smart money

A PE lawyer is usually involved in structuring and negotiating transactions such as buyouts, mergers and acquisitions (M&A), joint ventures, restructurings, divestitures etc. as well as drafting the requisite documentation required to close those transactions.

Apart from providing email responses to client’s questions on Nigerian law issues with regard to the transactions, I regularly take part in drafting, reviewing, negotiating and issuing comments on various agreements such as Investment Agreements, Share Subscription Agreements, Share Sale and Purchase Agreements, as well as Shareholders’ Agreements.

I also conduct due diligence investigations on target companies, i.e. companies that are sought to be acquired by organizations such as PE firms. The due diligence documents are usually uploaded to a virtual data room (i.e. an online site) for review, but there are occasions where the investigations may require visiting the target company’s offices to review hard copies of documents to verify the information provided.

My decision to study law was greatly influenced by my mother, who is an accomplished lawyer herself.  In my younger years, whenever I got into ‘trouble’, my mom was the one to go to – I was inspired by how she was always able to argue her way out of a variety of situations and thus aspired to be like that.

After choosing to study law, I wasn’t provided with much guidance on how to navigate through my career.  My mother suggested that I become a civil servant, but I didn’t fancy it because it didn’t seem ambitious enough.

I am delighted that I ended up becoming a corporate lawyer, considering that I was only advised to join the civil service.  It is a bit embarrassing but my decision to be a corporate lawyer was greatly influenced by a fictional character named Harvey Specter from a television series titled Suits.  I took a liking to the manner with which he closed deals and the confidence his clients reposed in him, so I considered it not bad to emulate him.  I didn’t have a plan at the beginning, but things sort of came through and I gradually leaned towards Private Equity and Corporate M&A once I started working at my current firm. Do I have any regrets? No

A young lawyer would need to be commercially aware.  Read the news and stay up to date with new laws, government policies, market statistics, the focus of investors and thriving industries, etc. Other soft skills like networking skills and the ability to build relationships are equally important because lawyers should always think of generating new business/clients and solidifying the existing ones.

I work mostly with global and local private equity investors, strategic buyers and sellers and other financial sponsors

It’s quite busy as expected, but nothing out of the ordinary – the typical level of work one would expect to face as a 5th-year lawyer. I work for 10 hours per day on average, but on some occasions (e.g. when a transaction is intense or about to close), then I may be required to for work longer hours (or even on weekends) to meet deadlines. I usually work as part of team, so everyone usually puts in their own bit, that way there’s not too much work left for only one person

The satisfaction on a client’s face, or the tone of their voice or email when you give them practical solutions that help solve their problems.  For me, there is nothing more rewarding than that.

Not quite.  There’s a lot of focus on theoretical (as opposed to practical) knowledge in the Law School and you find that it takes you about a minimum of 2 – 3 years of practice to really start to get a hang of things.  The Law School syllabus isn’t reflective of what truly obtains in the corporate legal world.

I’m just taking each day as it comes for now, but I don’t see myself leaving the practice of law.  I enjoy what I do.  It’s still early days in my career, so I’m making sure I garner as much experience as I can.  In the long term, I would like to be one of the go-to lawyers for corporate clients looking to do business/invest in Africa and, dare I say, maybe even the best African private equity lawyer that God ever created.

The most memorable thing that happened while working as a Private Equity Lawyer was receiving a cake and chocolate from a client after a deal closed.  It’s that memorable because it’s the only time that’s happened – and I enjoyed it

Take your career where you think it should go, not where others think it should go. Learn the trade and skills required for you be exceptional in this industry. Focus on building a long-lasting career instead of being fixated on obtaining immediate financial gratification.

legallyengagedIn house (Telecoms) – Bolu Ojewole
Read More

Private Equity Law Practice Interview with Edidem Basiekanem

Please note that all opinions expressed in this interview are the opinions of the lawyer interviewed. They do not necessarily represent the opinion of their employer or of Legally Engaged.

Private Equity (PE) is smart money deployed by investment management companies (usually PE firms) on behalf of themselves and other investors (e.g. pension funds, sovereign wealth funds, High Net-worth Individuals etc.) to invest in businesses and help such businesses grow. After a few years, the fund’s stake in the business is sold.

The most common ways a company raises money for expansion are either through loans or by listing its shares on an exchange. Private equity money isn’t made available publicly, but by investors who invest on behalf of themselves and other institutional investors in control for a stake in the business. They are also involved in the governance of the company (usually by taking up seats on the board) for the duration of their investment. This is why I call it smart money

A PE lawyer is usually involved in structuring and negotiating transactions such as buyouts, mergers and acquisitions (M&A), joint ventures, restructurings, divestitures etc. as well as drafting the requisite documentation required to close those transactions.

Apart from providing email responses to client’s questions on Nigerian law issues with regard to the transactions, I regularly take part in drafting, reviewing, negotiating and issuing comments on various agreements such as Investment Agreements, Share Subscription Agreements, Share Sale and Purchase Agreements, as well as Shareholders’ Agreements.

I also conduct due diligence investigations on target companies, i.e. companies that are sought to be acquired by organizations such as PE firms. The due diligence documents are usually uploaded to a virtual data room (i.e. an online site) for review, but there are occasions where the investigations may require visiting the target company’s offices to review hard copies of documents to verify the information provided.

My decision to study law was greatly influenced by my mother, who is an accomplished lawyer herself.  In my younger years, whenever I got into ‘trouble’, my mom was the one to go to – I was inspired by how she was always able to argue her way out of a variety of situations and thus aspired to be like that.

After choosing to study law, I wasn’t provided with much guidance on how to navigate through my career.  My mother suggested that I become a civil servant, but I didn’t fancy it because it didn’t seem ambitious enough.

I am delighted that I ended up becoming a corporate lawyer, considering that I was only advised to join the civil service.  It is a bit embarrassing but my decision to be a corporate lawyer was greatly influenced by a fictional character named Harvey Specter from a television series titled Suits.  I took a liking to the manner with which he closed deals and the confidence his clients reposed in him, so I considered it not bad to emulate him.  I didn’t have a plan at the beginning, but things sort of came through and I gradually leaned towards Private Equity and Corporate M&A once I started working at my current firm. Do I have any regrets? No

A young lawyer would need to be commercially aware.  Read the news and stay up to date with new laws, government policies, market statistics, the focus of investors and thriving industries, etc. Other soft skills like networking skills and the ability to build relationships are equally important because lawyers should always think of generating new business/clients and solidifying the existing ones.

I work mostly with global and local private equity investors, strategic buyers and sellers and other financial sponsors

It’s quite busy as expected, but nothing out of the ordinary – the typical level of work one would expect to face as a 5th-year lawyer. I work for 10 hours per day on average, but on some occasions (e.g. when a transaction is intense or about to close), then I may be required to for work longer hours (or even on weekends) to meet deadlines. I usually work as part of team, so everyone usually puts in their own bit, that way there’s not too much work left for only one person

The satisfaction on a client’s face, or the tone of their voice or email when you give them practical solutions that help solve their problems.  For me, there is nothing more rewarding than that.

Not quite.  There’s a lot of focus on theoretical (as opposed to practical) knowledge in the Law School and you find that it takes you about a minimum of 2 – 3 years of practice to really start to get a hang of things.  The Law School syllabus isn’t reflective of what truly obtains in the corporate legal world.

I’m just taking each day as it comes for now, but I don’t see myself leaving the practice of law.  I enjoy what I do.  It’s still early days in my career, so I’m making sure I garner as much experience as I can.  In the long term, I would like to be one of the go-to lawyers for corporate clients looking to do business/invest in Africa and, dare I say, maybe even the best African private equity lawyer that God ever created.

The most memorable thing that happened while working as a Private Equity Lawyer was receiving a cake and chocolate from a client after a deal closed.  It’s that memorable because it’s the only time that’s happened – and I enjoyed it

Take your career where you think it should go, not where others think it should go. Learn the trade and skills required for you be exceptional in this industry. Focus on building a long-lasting career instead of being fixated on obtaining immediate financial gratification.

legallyengagedPrivate Equity Law Practice Interview with Edidem Basiekanem
Read More

Entertainment Law Practice Interview with Oyinkan Fawehinmi

Please note that all opinions expressed in this interview are the opinions of the lawyer interviewed. They do not necessarily represent the opinion of their employer or of Legally Engaged.

The Entertainment industry is an ecosystem which caters to creatives such as recording and performing artistes, comedians, dancers, film actors, sports personalities, etc. The industry is founded on the tenets of Intellectual Property which includes copyright, trademark, image rights, etc. The Nigerian Entertainment industry is still in its budding stages and requires more professionals to create principles and structures in the industry.

My typical daily activities as an Entertainment lawyer include:

Reviewing and negotiating various entertainment contracts such as Distribution/License/IP sale or transfer documents

Writing opinions on various issues relating to the industry for a wide range of clients

Attending business development strategy meeting with and on behalf of clients

Sourcing deals and contracts for clients

Crisis Management

I love the process of creativity and I believe so much in the power the arts have in shaping and influencing culture generally.

My top three attributes tenacity, innovation and hard work

I work with mostly creative people who have no idea of how the business side of things work so I have to do a lot of education as to rights, business ethics, management of expectations etc.

My workload is crazy because I have to constantly be the innovative solution provider for my clients at every point of their careers. It is a new industry so the professionals are charged with the responsibility of putting necessary structures in place to encourage the industry to blossom. So it’s a lot of trial and error and your clients think you are their messiah.

The most rewarding aspect of this sector for me is the beauty of watching a creative idea come into its full potential.

Law school did not prepare me for this sector in any way. All my skills were acquired during my undergraduate years and my school played a role in sharpening those skills. Law school for me was like zombie mode. Just cram and pour it back out for the exams.

Law School prepared me but not adequately. I was however able to catch-up through dedication and devotion during my time in the employment of one of the big firms in Nigeria. I learnt most things I didn’t know in law school then and most importantly is the burning desire to live your dream. I would have not been here today if I didn’t take the bold step to quit my well-paid job as a young lawyer to live and practice what I believe in.

I see myself in ten years heading a vertical chain ecosystem in the African industry. So I see myself either as CEO in a one stop shop entertainment company like a Time Warner Company or Universal Group.

My most memorable event has to be when one of the companies I work with got a music producer his first cheque for a job he produced about a decade ago. It was very moving for me because my life is dedicated to ensuring creatives are well rewarded.

My advice is you must come with a truck load of passion to work in the entertainment industry. Because the industry is still in its formative years, it needs vibrant and passionate lawyers

legallyengagedEntertainment Law Practice Interview with Oyinkan Fawehinmi
Read More

Human Rights Law Practice Interview with Caleb Onwe

Please note that all opinions expressed in this interview are the opinions of the lawyer interviewed. They do not necessarily represent the opinion of their employer or of Legally Engaged.

Human Rights protection is sometimes referred to as public interest litigation. This area of law includes representing people whose human rights are violated either by state agencies or corporate organizations and individuals. It also involves holding the government accountable or challenging policies and programs of government that are anti-masses in court of law.

I choose this part of the profession because of my passion for humanity. I believe that we all owe a duty to ensure that our society is free for all, and everyone has equal opportunity to attain the zenith of his/her aspiration in life. When this is not guaranteed, there is bound to be rift and chaos in the society as it is today.

Taxation is an interesting and budding area of law in Nigeria, and its smooth workability if well managed, would naturally lead to wealth redistribution and ultimately boost the economy.

 

I believe making impact in Nigeria’s taxation system would be a fast means of contributing to the development of Nigeria, which has always been my earnest desire. So, I chose taxation because I wanted to contribute to its growth and development of Nigeria ultimately.

A young lawyer needs the zeal and passion for humanity. The road is very tough especially for young lawyers but with uncompromising zeal, you will not be cajoled by forces against humanity.

I work with all types of people whose fundamental human rights are infringed.

The workload is very tedious especially if you work alone like I do in my newly established law firm (PENLIT & GREYSON SOLICITORS). It can be difficult to meet up with schedules. I work 15hrs a day including weekends.

The most challenging aspect of the work is lack of funds, slow pace of our justice system and wrong impression of the duties of lawyers by pedestrians. For instance, when after listening to the magistrate conclude the case of an accused yesterday 11/5/17 without trial and conviction, I stood up to take over the case, to many people who were in the court I was not doing any good thing because according to them the accused committed the offence thereby does not need legal representation. I however told the court that even though it seems the case has been concluded against the accused, that my coming is to ensure that the prosecution proves his case as required by law before he is convicted; my duty is not to secure acquittal but to ensure that justice is done in the matter.

But in all, the most pressing challenge is fund if you are starting newly and on your own because most of the client you may stand for might not have the money to pay.

The fulfillment of helping some people regain their societal value in life and also seeing that you are contributing to the advancement of your society and our laws.

Law School prepared me but not adequately. I was however able to catch-up through dedication and devotion during my time in the employment of one of the big firms in Nigeria. I learnt most things I didn’t know in law school then and most importantly is the burning desire to live your dream. I would have not been here today if I didn’t take the bold step to quit my well-paid job as a young lawyer to live and practice what I believe in.

With undivided attention and focus, I think someone in my career would be able to be among the leading young human rights advocates in the profession where the person can be able to have contributed in shaping many issues in the country. I would like to end up in the zenith of this profession.

Giving back life to someone who already lost hope in the society he lives. One of my clients, let’s call him LJ, would have died in prison hospital if I did not intervene. He was hospitalized throughout his two months’ incarceration in Ikoyi prisons with the kidney disease, fainting daily and not feeding properly. My intervention ensured his bail, discharge and onward treatment after. I filed for the variation of the bail terms of LJ and the prosecuting police officer asked me to “settle” him or else he will oppose my application. Fortunately, his opposition did not see the light of the day and justice prevailed.

Young lawyers who have interest in taking a career in Public Interest Litigation should be sure they have passion for humanity. Your interest should be genuine in order to make the best of it. It may not be paying at the beginning but with consistency and persistence, the future is bright.

legallyengagedHuman Rights Law Practice Interview with Caleb Onwe
Read More